Welcome…

Welcome to our page of exploration and discovery in the world of nature photography!

We want to share our images and vision with anyone stumbling across our pages.  🙂  Between the two of us, we’ve made a large number of photographs.  Of course, we’ve been doing so for a long time; we’ve been married for nearly 30 years, and had been photographing for many years before that!

From time to time, we will discuss things we found in nature.  Often, it may be a piece of nature you have not noticed, or perhaps we will give you a different look at a familiar subject.

Discovery also includes our insight into why we make photographs, how we make photographs, and why we make photographs.  And, make photographs, we must!

So, with that said, welcome to our world of nature photography…

Larry & Gayle Millican

Van Buren, Arkansas

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This Photo, #8

This Photo, #8

Just an Old Barn

Image File DSC05688

August 2013

The last post, here, we talked about photographing a Chevrolet pickup truck

After leaving the truck, Mark and Mike and I drove past Cass and Turner Bend and were heading home.  It had been a long day, and we were ready to go home, and it was nearly sunset.  Along Highway 23, we saw an old barn in some amazing light, looked at each other, stopped and jumped out… Continue reading

This Photo, #7

This Photo, #7

Just an Old Truck

File DSC05669

August 2013

 

A few years ago, on a warm and humid August day, two of my friends and I explored some backroads of the Arkansas Ozarks from sunup to sundown.  We photographed landscapes, old buildings, little waterfalls, wildflowers, and more.

Final-DSC05592
Continue reading

Familiar Places

Familiar Places

Many photographers, especially outdoor and nature photographers, including me, like to travel and to seek out new locations and scenes.  There is so much in this country, not to mention the world, yet to be seen.

However, circumstances and time often prevent us from traveling, so we learn to make the best of the locations near to home.  And, we soon find that we have favorites:  “go-to” places that always give us a photo opportunity.

Returning there often, we learn the best times to go, we see the seasons change, and we challenge ourselves to see familiar things in a new way.

My go-to locations near my home in Western Arkansas have been Natural Dam, Devils Den State Park, and Cherokee and Flanagan Prairies, among a few other spots.  I always find something to photograph at these locations. Continue reading

The 2017 Annual Ten

The 2017 Annual Ten

Once again, it is time to review the photographs made this year, and select my favorites.  We have been doing this for the past several years, and I look forward to it every year.  This year, I started with over 50 photos, and after making several passes through the collection, and making some tough decisions, I selected the 10 photographs that gave me the most joy and satisfaction when I made them, and continue to do so now.  Here are my Favorites for 2017, in roughly chronological order… Continue reading

The Greatest Time of Day

The Greatest Time of Day

Larry-Sunrise-Pano-Crop-A7R-3805

Devil’s Den State Park f/16, 1/200 sec, and ISO 400, 24-70 zoom lens set to 24mm.

Ever since I began making photographs, I prefer to photograph the morning.  I like to be there for that transition from night to day, when the colors change, and the light changes, and the day is fresh and with a new beginning.  And… every morning, every day, is different…  

NaturalDam-Dawn2-A7R-4363

Natural Dam f/16, 1/8 sec, ISO 100, 24mm pre-dawn light

In the winter, you see frost on rock edges and on the edges of leaves, and ribbons of ice from stems of plants, and you see frozen water, and fog rising from streams, and you feel the crispness of the air, and you see your breath… Continue reading

This Photo, #6

This Photo, #6

Two years ago, at dawn on a cold December morning, I visited Natural Dam and made one of my favorite photographs ever. There was a fog rising from the water, and the sun was just about to rise, and the fog glowed in the pre-dawn light.

December Sunrise

This was the first photo I made that morning, and after I tried some different compositions and exposures, I moved on to different locations around the waterfall. This is my normal approach – to look at a scene, and to explore different viewpoints.  Eventually, I saw this scene… Continue reading

This Photo, #5

This Photo, #5

Building the Nest
Great Egrets, High Island Sanctuaries
April 2007

For many years, we traveled to the Upper Gulf Coast of Texas in the spring. We would visit Brazos Bend State Park, Galveston Island, Anahuac National Wildlife Refuge, Bolivar Island, and High Island. Spring is breeding season for birds, alligators, and many other creatures. In 2007, we timed our visit quite well, and were able to photograph several animal species in prime breeding plumage and nest building, including alligators’

Displaying alligator
Alligator during breeding season, Brazos Bend State Par

mating displays.

 

East of Galveston is the small community called High Island.  It is not an island, but sits on a “salt dome”, 38 feet above sea level.  (This is the highest point above sea level on the Gulf Coast from Mobile, Alabama, to the Yucatan.)  The Houston Audubon Society operates a bird sanctuary within the community, and is a popular destination for birders and birdwatchers from all over the world.

Cormorants at the Nest

Cormorants at the Nest, High Island Audubon Sanctuary

Within the Smith Oaks Sanctuary, is Claybottom Pond – home to a bird rookery. Species nesting there include Cormorants,  Night Herons, Tri-colored herons, Roseate spoonbills, and more. The rookery is on a small island at a perfect distance for photographing and watching the birds. If you want to know more about the rookery, and all of the High Island Sanctuary, here is a link to Houston Audubon’s site.

Today’s photograph was made late in the afternoon, with the sun behind us. This pair was early in the nest building stage, as most of the other birds were well into the season, with eggs laid already. The male came flying in with nesting material (tree branches and sticks) to add to the structure, and as he landed and gave the stick to his mate, his wing  spread in a gesture that appeared to be protective, supportive, warm, and nurturing.

Great Egret Pair Building the Nest

Great Egret Pair Building the Nest, High Island Audubon Sanctuary

 

I was using a Sony Alpha 100 DSLR Camera, with a Tamron 300mm f/2.8 lens and a matching 2x teleconverter, making the lens 600 mm. Shutter speed was 1/800, ISO 200, and aperture of f/8. Today, I would not hesitate to shoot at an ISO of 800, maybe higher, resulting in a much faster shutter speed. The photo would be sharper… but, the point of the image, its mood, and the story, still is clear, and speaks of companionship, teamwork, family, and love.

This photo, #5 in this series, is about capturing a moment, and sharing a story, regardless of technical perfection.  The original image suffers from camera movement blur.  Today, we can edit the photo in Photoshop, and apply shake reduction sharpening, and at the least, improve the sharpness of the image.  And, that was done with this photo.  But, was it necessary?  Does it now tell a better story?  I believe photography is about capturing a moment, about telling a story, and sharing that moment and the story.  If the story is clear, and if you see the moment, and if you feel the passion of the photographer, does that not make it a good photograph?  Would like to hear your opinion!


“Capturing a beautiful moment in a photo is something I’m very passionate about.”                                             ~Nigel Barker


Until next time …  wishing you good light!